<![CDATA[Generation Ivory - Blog]]>Sat, 27 Feb 2016 11:17:04 -0800Weebly<![CDATA[Ivory Christmas Traditions]]>Tue, 25 Dec 2012 17:30:23 GMThttp://www.generationivory.com/blog/ivory-christmas-traditionsFor many years it has been an Ivory ChristmasTradition to make banana but waffles in Christmas morning.
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It has been a tradition to make waffles on Christmas morning ever since my grandpa can remember. He told me that he can remember his father making waffles on Christmas morning ever since he was 5 years old. My grandpa was born in 1934, so this tradition has been going on for at least 70 years.

This tradition is so important to my grandpa that there hasn't been one year that has been missed.

My dad's oldest sister was born on Christmas Day in 1954. At about 3:30 in the morning my grandparents left for the hospital. They told me that "in those days" the husband had to go to a competely different floor in the hospital and wait for the baby to be born.

As my grandpa was sitting there by himself waiting for my aunt to be born he thought to himself "we'll if I just have to wait here for hours by myself and I can't even be in the delivery room, I might as well go home and eat some waffles..." So, while my grandma was in labor with their first child my grandpa left the hospital to heat waffles with his parents and siblings.

As everyone sat down at the table to eat waffles my grandpa's older sister asked "Well where's Jenille?" My grandpa replied "She at the hospital having a baby..." His sister yelled at him and told him to get his butt back to the hospital! By the time grandpa got back to the hospital my grandma had given birth to their daughter. They had been looking for him for a while when he finally showed up.

So, as you can see, sometimes there is nothing that can keep you from breaking family traditions!

(Oh by the way, my grandma has NEVER forgotten or forgiven him for leaving her that day at the hospital! Haha)
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Merry Christmas to all!
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<![CDATA[July 24, 1847 - Mathew Hayes Ivory]]>Tue, 24 Jul 2012 21:58:02 GMThttp://www.generationivory.com/blog/july-24-1847-mathew-hayes-ivory

Mathew Hayes Ivory, JR.
1809-1885

Mathew Hayes Ivory, JR. was born 13 July 1809 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Mathew Hayes Ivory, SR. and Ann McNulty. 

Mathew JR. was first married to Mary Susan Cox and lived in Burlington County, New Jersey. Mathew and Mary had seven children. Mathew joined the LDS Church in the mid-1840s while living in Burlington County, New Jersey.

Mary was not fond of LDS Church and Mathew joining. A couple of years after Mathew joined the LDS Church Mary forced Mathew to leave his wife and seven children behind.

In early 1847 Mathew left New Jersey and headed west to meet the Saints in Nauvoo. By the time Mathew reached Illinois Brigham Young and the first group of pioneers were about to make their way west. Mathew decided to join the pioneers on their journey.

Mathew was one of the first pioneers into the Salt Lake Valley with Brigham Young and the first group of pioneers. His name is on the monument at This Is The Place Heritage Park in Salt Lake City, Utah.
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Photo from DeseretNews.com
Mathew made multiple travels back and forth between Utah and the eastern states over the years. He married Mary Elizabeth Judith Bemus on 14 December 1854 in Lewistown, Fulton County, Illinois.

After returning to Utah Mathew and Mary moved to central Utah in present day Sanpete County. They had seven children:
  • George Washington Ivory
  • Reuben Norris Ivory
  • Linus Brigham Ivory
  • Isaac Eneas Ivory
  • Martha Amelia Ivory
  • Mary Ann Ivory
  • Frederick Olson Ivory


I am grateful for everything Mathew did and accomplished in his life. Because of his faithfulness and dedication to the Gospel and his courage, I have been blessed to grow up with the Gospel in my life and the great family I have.

If you want to read more about Mathew and his life, visit his profile page.
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<![CDATA[Harris Dean Larson]]>Sun, 20 May 2012 00:05:26 GMThttp://www.generationivory.com/blog/harris-dean-larson
Harris Dean Larson was born 3 August 1928 in Moroni, Sanpete County, Utah.

This last week was his last in mortality here on this earth. He passed away 15 May 2012 in St. George, Washington County, Utah.
He married Vonda Gay Ivory on 8 June 1946 in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah. They were sealed for time and all eternity in the Manti Temple three years later on 7 November 1949. 

Today was Uncle Dean's funeral, held in St. George. The service was beautiful and reflected Dean with all of his humor, love for others, his love the Savior and his honor for the Priesthood. 
We will all miss Uncle Dean very much, but we know that we will one day see him again and be able to feel of his love and presence. 

To Aunt Vonda, we all love you very much and are so blessed to have you in our lives. I personally love coming and staying at your house and all the fun we have playing games late into the evening. 

Below are some photographs reflecting Dean's life and family. We love you Dean!
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<![CDATA[Family Spotlight - Soren Severin Nielsen]]>Mon, 07 May 2012 04:49:20 GMThttp://www.generationivory.com/blog/family-spotlight-soren-severin-nielsenOver the past few months research on the Ivory family has continued and more organization in pictures, documents and other information has been done.

Although there haven't been a lot of blog posts written about the research done, plenty of work has been completed.

One of my goals lately has been to make sure I have all the U.S. Federal Census records for all of my direct ancestors for 5 generations, including my mother's side of the family.

I have spent a good portion of the day going through my great-great grandfather, Soren Severin Nielsen and his family.

Soren Severin Nielsen and Mary Ann Swensen

Family Group Sheet

Family Group Sheet for Soren Severin Nielsen

Husband:

Soren Severin Nielsen

b:

07 Apr 1869 in , , Denmark

d:

04 Apr 1960 in Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial:

08 Apr 1960 in Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

m:

11 Dec 1891 in Manti, Sanpete Co., Utah

Father:

Mother:

Wife:

Mary Ann Swensen

b:

24 Mar 1867 in Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

d:

31 May 1945 in Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Burial:

Jun 1945 in Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

Father:

Mother:

Children:

1

F

Name:

Addie Viola Nielsen

b:

Dec 1892 in , , Utah

2

M

Name:

Lars S. Nielsen

b:

Feb 1895 in , , Utah

3

F

Name:

Artie J. Nielsen

b:

Nov 1896 in , , Utah

4

F

Name:

Anna L. Nielsen

b:

Sep 1898 in , , Utah

5

M

Name:

Ephraim W. Nielsen

b:

Abt. 1901 in , , Utah

6

F

Name:

Minnie I. Nielsen

b:

Abt. 1903 in , , Utah

7

F

Name:

Mary Erma Nielsen

b:

12 Mar 1905 in Moroni, Sanpete Co., Utah

d:

20 Jan 1971

m:

23 Feb 1926 in Nephi, Juab Co., Utah

Spouse:

Ellis Clark Ivory

8

M

Name:

Elmer F. Nielsen

b:

Abt. 1908 in , , Utah

Notes

Page 1 of 1

Sunday, May 6, 2012 10:42:48 PM

To read more about Soren Severin Nielsen and his family, visit their profile pages.
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<![CDATA[A Day of Scanning Photos and Documents!]]>Sat, 01 Oct 2011 21:29:31 GMThttp://www.generationivory.com/blog/a-day-of-scanning-photos-and-documentsLast weekend my dad's cousin and aunt came into town. We spent Saturday afternoon scanning documents and photos and sharing them with each other. It was such a great time to be able to spend with family and help each other in our genealogy efforts.

On thing we talked about was a way to better collaborate with each other and how we could better share our genealogy files with each other. I had the idea of using Dropbox. We both have free Dropbox accounts right now, but I suggested we get a "Family Dropbox" subscription so we can store all our photos, documents, stories and any other genealogy document we want to share with each other. My dad's cousin that that was such a great idea! 

For those of you who may not know what Dropbox is, it is a great way to store, backup and share files on your computer with anyone you want. All you have to do is add their email to the folders you want to share with others and immediately they will be able to access all those great documents you have found in your genealogy research. You can download your own free 2GB account by clicking this link:
http://db.tt/77rl5Ye - This link will let you set up a free account, as well as give us BOTH 256MB more free space!

One of my tasks this weekend is to set up this "Family" account. Before I do, I need to go through and organize my genealogy files better! I know, I should already have everything organized, but I admit I have been a little messy with all my files lately... :P

Thank you Linda and Vonda for coming up and collaborating our genealogy together!! I look forward to the next time we can get together again!
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<![CDATA[Distant Cousin Connection Found]]>Sat, 17 Sep 2011 16:37:47 GMThttp://www.generationivory.com/blog/distant-cousin-connection-foundOn Sunday some of my friends in my ward got together for dinner. As we were talking one of my new friends mentioned she was from Manti, Utah. As soon as she said that the genealogist inside me kicked in. 

While doing my family history I remembered coming across some people with the last name Braithwaite and I was pretty sure they were from Manti, or at least one of those little towns in central Utah. I said to her, "I think we might be cousins."

We then sat down, I pulled out my phone and opened up one of my genealogy apps to figure out how we were related. I showed her my connection to John Braithwaite. From the diagram below, you can see that my 2nd great-grandfather was George Washington Ivory.
  • I am descended through his youngest son, Ellis Clark Ivory. 
  • George had a daughter named Mercie Ella Ivory. 
  • She married John Braithwaite.
  • John Braithwaite's grandfather was Rowloand Braithwaite.
  • Rowland Braithwaite's 3rd great-granddaughter is my friend!
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(click on the diagram for a bigger image)
This just comes to show that you never know who you might run into that you end up figuring out that you are distant cousins of some sort - even if it is like this and it it just through marriage!
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<![CDATA[1810 Census and Moyamensing Township]]>Mon, 05 Sep 2011 22:58:58 GMThttp://www.generationivory.com/blog/1810-census-and-moyamensing-townshipThe 1810 U.S. Federal Census is one of the only documents that gives any information about Mathew Hayes Ivory, Sr. and his family.
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In 1810 Mathew and his family were living in Moyamensing Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

I had never heard of Moyamensing so I decided to learn more about it and where exactly it was located. When doing a Google search on Moyamensing, the first result is a page on Wikipedia. According to Wikipedia, "Moyamensing was originally a township on the fast land of the Neck, lying between Passyunk and Wicaco. It was incorporated into the Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania and is today primarily a neighborhood in the South Philadelphia section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States."

Below is a map showing the boundaries of where Moyamensing was.
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History of Moyamensing
"The tract was granted by the Dutch West India Company Lieutenant Alexander d'Hinoyossa, Vice-Director of New Amstel to Martin Clensmith, William Stille and Lawrence Andries. In 1684, when the land was turned over from the Dutch to the English, the title was given by William Penn to William Stille, Lassey Andrews, Andrew Bankson and John Matson.

Moyamensing Township included this ground and Wicaco, except such parts of the latter as were included in Southwark. Its northern boundary was South Street and below the existing parts of Southwark; its eastern boundary was the Delaware River, and its western boundary was Schuylkill Sixth (Seventeenth Street). 

In 1816 the greatest length of Moyamensing was estimated to be 3 miles; the greatest breadth, 2 miles; area, 2,560 acres (10 km²). By act of March 24, 1812, the inhabitants of Moyamensing were incorporated by the style of "the commissioners and inhabitants of the township of Moyamensing." By act of April 4, 1831, the township was divided into East and West Moyamensing. The township was one of the earliest created after the settlement of Pennsylvania, and became part of Philadelphia in 1854.

The Moyamensing Prison was built between 1822-1835 at Reed and 10th Streets. A portion of it also housed a Debtors Prison. The structure was demolished in 1967." - Wikipedia



Source Citation:
1810 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Moyamensing Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, Page 127, Line 20, Mathew Ivory household, .jpeg image (Online: Ancestry.com, 2011) [Digital scan of original records in the National Archives, Washington, D.C.], subscription database, <http://www.ancestry.com>, accessed September 2011.  
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<![CDATA[New Pedigree and Descendant Charts Added]]>Mon, 05 Sep 2011 21:44:37 GMThttp://www.generationivory.com/blog/new-pedigree-and-descendant-charts-addedYesterday I was working on adding content to the website and one of the things I added was the Family Tree page containing the pedigree chart of Mathew Hayes Ivory, Jr. as well of a descendancy chart of Mathew and his wife Mary Elizabeth Judith Bemus.
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The family tree and descendant chart are one of the ways to get to the individual profiles on the website. If you are wanting to see the individual profile of anyone on the charts, simply click their bubble and you will be taken there to see more information, documents and other family members.
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<![CDATA[GenerationIvory Blog and Website is Revamped!]]>Sun, 21 Aug 2011 00:24:16 GMThttp://www.generationivory.com/blog/generationivory-blog-and-website-is-revampedThis post will not be very long, nor is this website anywhere near complete, but I wanted to make a quick blog post about the new website, design and blog.

I am hoping this site will be a great resource for those who are doing their family history and especially for those who are researching the Ivory family.

If you are a descendant of Mathew Hayes Ivory, born 1809 in Philadelphia, or related to any Ivory family members, please feel free to let the Ivory Family Association know of any research you are conducting, or any comments or questions you may have.

Happy Researching!!
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